Two Delicious Experiments.

Twice-Baked Sweet Potatoes & Beef Satay.

mmmmm, sweet potatoes.
some of you may also refer to sweet potatoes as ‘yams’, but you’d actually be talking about something quite different. so listen up! or continue to sound like a produce idiot. or something. so in case you are interested in the difference between a yam and a sweet potato (and why you have most likely never eaten an actual yam) read on. if not, scroll on!

the yam belongs to the Dioscoreaceae family, whereas sweet potatoes are in the Convolvulaceae family (a.k.a the Morning Glory family – if you ever grow sweet potatoes, check out the leaves, they look just like morning glory!) yams are a root vegetable found in Asia, Latin America and in West Africa where it is a culturally significant commodity. so yeah, that’s a little bit about why you’ve never tasted a yam, but most likely LOVE sweet potatoes, like i do! the following sweet potatoes are the Garnet variety.

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for these beauties, i rubbed the skins with oil and baked them (at 375) in the oven, whole, until soft. i followed this recipe as i went through a recent love affair with this blog. after cooked, i sliced the sweet potatoes in half and scooped out the goodstuff and put it in a bowl. have you made twice-baked potatoes before? if so, then you might think that the above step would be easy, but you’d be wrong. the sweet potato skin is much more fragile that a “regular” potato, so try to be very careful not to tear it.

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mash the warm sweet potato flesh with butter, garlic, milk, salt and pepper. fold in thyme and goat cheese (chevre). the recipe called for feta – but goat cheese is a billion times better in my opinion, so eat that. now, the recipe told me to put the mash mixture into a piping back, and pipe it into the sweet potato shells. i don’t have a piping bag, do you? so i loaded the mixture into a plastic ziplock (the mash should be cool enough to not heat the plastic), snipped a corner, and piped the mash in that way. i think that the blogger must have had a different mash consistency than myself, because i couldn’t really get the mash to have a stiffened, piped design/pattern. (ps. forget the green onion in the photo above, but then dig deep to remember it again for the dish below.)

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see what i mean, no fancy piping design. but! totally didn’t matter because it still looked nice, and tasted even better. ok, so after you put the mash into the shells, bake the potatoes for an additional 10-15 minutes, then crumble chevre and chopped pecans on top. i recommend toasting the pecans first, for maximum deliciousness.

on to the next dish…

lemme just take a second to say that this Beef Satay was one of the mother-lovin’ BEST things i have ever eaten!!! so amazing. so pleasantly surprised. so delicious.

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The ingredients in the satay marinade include:
1/3 cup dry roasted peanuts
1/3 cup light brown sugar
1/4 cup plus 1 1/2 tablespoons low sodium soy sauce
1/4 stalk lemongrass, chopped
3 garlic cloves, chopped
1/2 lime, juiced
1 tablespoon peeled and diced baby ginger — uhhh, or adult ginger?
1 tablespoon turmeric
1/4 teaspoon curry powder
1/4 teaspoon black pepper

(Reserve 1/3 cup of the marinade to use in the peanut sauce. )

Marinate steak that has been cubed in the marinade for at least 4 hours. After that time, put cubes of marinated beef onto wood skewers and grill in hot oil for 2 minutes on each side until browned. i used a cast iron skillet and coconut oil and that worked just fine. serve skewers with peanut sauce and green onions! ta-dah!

for the peanut sauce, i recommend using your favorite recipe. the ingredients list in the original recipe is a little long. this is the peanut sauce that we drink like water around here:
1/2 cup peanut butter
1/3 cup warm water
3 T soy sauce
3 T rice vinegar
1 T dark sesame oil
1.5 teaspoons hot chili paste

whisk together all ingredients. alter the water quantity to reach desired consistency.

hope you try it ya’ll!

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